Posts Tagged YouTube

A social media/web snapshot of Collingwood, Hawthorn and Port Adelaide

Posted by Laura on Sunday, 14 November, 2010

Last week, I asked my Twitter followers if there was any team that anyone might data about. I said I’d pretty much be happy to dump as much of the data I have regarding those teams (or athletes) into a document that might provide some interesting insights into the teams. Even if not, it would offer benchmarks for further study. A lot of what I have is random and really depends on what sites I’m looking at, how often I update, how motivated I am get additional data, etc. I tend to go hunting when I have a purpose and those periods see an increase in specific teams. What I need rarely turns out to be what I have but that’s a challenge with creative research.

That all said and done, what my followers requested were Collingwood, Hawthorn and Port Adelaide. The links below are to the pdf files containing the data I have about them. (There might be a few small things left out.)

Related Posts:

Joel Monaghan’s Mad Monday and the Online Canberra Raiders Fan Base

Posted by Laura on Sunday, 7 November, 2010

Laura Hale, University of Canberra

November 7, 2010

A copy of this article is available in .pdf.

This article references the Jason Akermanis and Melbourne Storm articles.

Abstract

The Joel Monaghan dog sex picture story broke on November 3, 2010. By November 5, people were demanding that Monaghan be sacked. Sponsors were threatening to pull their support if the team failed to fire him. This was another major Australian sport controversy in the making. Given the sponsor demands and media attention to the story, the questions are: How much do fans of the Canberra Raiders and the NRL really care about it, and what is the impact of Monaghan’s action on the online fan base? This paper answers that question by looking at Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, Wikia and a few other selected sites. It concludes that the story was largely a non-event in terms of causing people to stop barracking for the Raiders. It also finds that there may be indicators that this type of story gets more attention in geographic areas where the NRL would hope to grow their fanbase. This latter part could be the biggest problem for the NRL.

Keywords: NRL, Canberra Raiders, Joel Monaghan, Mad Monday, RSPCA, social media

Joel Monaghan’s Mad Monday and the Online Canberra Raiders Fan Base

Figure 1. 5 Nov 2010 front page of The Canberra Times.

Figure 2. 6 Nov 2010 front page of The Canberra Times.

Figure 3. 7 Nov 2010 front page of The Canberra Times.

In Canberra, the story of Joel Monaghan’s Mad Monday actions has been above the fold in the city’s leading newspaper for two days and was the whole cover on the third. The story was sensational and received coverage in other newspapers across the country such as The Daily Telegraph, The Herald-Sun, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Adelaide Advertiser and The Australian. According to The Canberra Times, Monaghan was involved in a prank where he was photographed “sitting on a tiled floor with a dog’s head near his exposed groin.” (Dutton & Moloney, 2010, November 5) The pictures had gone viral on Twitter (Dutton, 2010, November 6) and sponsors threatened to pull their support if the Raiders failed to sack Monghan for his actions. (Dutton, 2010, November 6)

This news was bad news for the Raiders as sponsorship is an important revenue stream for the club. Beyond that, Monaghan’s actions are potentially bad for rugby league and the NRL who have an image problem in Australia, where players are viewed by some people as uneducated thugs. This characterization of NRL players can be witnessed by doing a quick Google search for NRL scandal as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4. A screencap of a search for NRL scandal on Google. Screenshot is dated Nov 6, 2010.

Scandals like Monaghan’s have the possibility of hurting the NRL in terms of growing the size of their potential audience and widening their demographic base so that they can better compete with other leagues in the country like the AFL, who draw upon larger segments of the population, including women. Measuring exactly how people respond to these controversies is difficult as there are an array of dependent and independent variables that factor into why people support their clubs, and how much money they will spend to do that. These variables include a club’s performance, loyalty to a club, available disposable income, amount of free time, availability for attending matches, television coverage, and merchandise to name a few.

It is an interesting exercise to critically examine how scandals can impact a club’s supporter base. In the case of the Jason Akermanis scandal in the AFL in June 2010, there was little negative impact in terms of supporters shifting their loyalties away from the club in the immediate aftermath of the scandal. (Hale, 2010, June 14) In the NRL, the Melbourne Storm salary cap controversy in May 2010 saw a huge immediate spike in interest and demonstrations of online loyalty to the club. (Hale, 2010, May 20)

The question for this scandal is thus: What was the immediate impact on the online Canberra Raiders community in response to the media coverage of the Joel Monaghan dog sex prank? This paper will attempt to answer that question by looking at Facebook, Wikipedia, Twitter, Wikia, YouTube and Yahoo!Groups.

Twitter

Twitter is a microblogging platform that is popular in Australia. According to Alexa, it is the tenth most popular site in the country. (Alexa Internet, Inc., 2010) There is an active community of Australian sport fans on it who frequently discuss what is going on with their favorite teams and athletes. Sport organizations, leagues, clubs and athletes also use Twitter to engage with fans. The Canberra Raiders are on Twitter at @RaidersCanberra.

There are several methods that can be employed to begin to understand how the Canberra Raiders fanbase responded to the Monaghan controversy that broke on November 4, 2010. This includes looking at any shift in the geographic location of Canberra Raiders fans on Twitter, comparing the total number of new followers for the Raiders to other teams over the same period, looking at the geographic location of Tweets that mention Monaghan versus the team, and looking to see how many Tweets mention Monaghan and the Raiders together. Each of these different methods gives a different perspective on how fans responded and when looked at together, give a more informed big picture perspective.

One way of measuring the impact of the Monaghan scandal on Twitter is to compare the geographic location of the Canberra Raiders followers and to see if there were any noticeable shifts before and after the scandal broke. The way this was done in this paper was to get a list of all the followers for @RaidersCanberra, get the location that the user included on their profile, and get the timezone that the person listed themselves as from. Using those two pieces of information, translate that into a real location. For example, “canberra :) ” would be the location Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia. Once as many locations have been identified as possible, they are totaled by date.

The October 15 @RaidersCanberra list had 996 followers on it. Of these, 772 had a country location attached to them. The November 6 @RaidersCanberra list had 1,071 followers on it. Of these, a country location could be identified for 790. When locations are removed because they are not Australian or New Zealand locations that include a city, there remains 454 locations for October 15 and 483 for November 6. Table 1 shows difference for followers by city and date. Only the cities where the difference did not equal zero were included.

Table 1

@RaidersCanberra followers by City

Location
15-Oct

6-Nov

Difference
Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
9

10


1
Belconnen,Australian Capital Territory,Australia
1

2

1
Bowen,Queensland,Australia
1

0

-1
Brisbane,Queensland,Australia
49

50

1
Canberra,Australian Capital Territory,Australia
145

154


9
Casino,New South Wales,Australia
1

0

-1
Cremorne,New South Wales,Australia
1

0

-1
Gold Coast,Queensland,Australia
7

16

9
Gosford,New South Wales,Australia
2

1


-1
Greystanes,New South Wales,Australia
1

0

-1
Hamilton,Waikato,New Zealand
1

0

-1
Jerrabomberra,New South Wales,Australia
1

0

-1
Mandurah,Western Australia,Australia
1

0


-1
Newcastle,New South Wales,Australia
10

16

6
Orange,New South Wales,Australia
0

2

2
Parramatta,New South Wales,Australia
1

2

1
Penrith,New South Wales,Australia
2

3


1
Queanbeyan,New South Wales,Australia
3

5

2
Rockhampton,Queensland,Australia
2

3

1
South Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
1

0

-1
Sydney,New South Wales,Australia
97

106


9
Taigum,Queensland,Australia
1

0

-1
Turramurra,New South Wales,Australia
2

1

-1
Tweed Heads,New South Wales,Australia
2

1

-1
Wallacia,New South Wales,Australia
1

0


-1
Wellington,New South Wales,Australia
1

0

-1
Wellington,Wellington,New Zealand
2

1

-1

There were 93 total Australian and New Zealand cities on this list. Of them, only 27 saw any difference in the total volume of followers from that location. Some of these differences could be explained as an issue with processing or user profile changes. A person may have used geographic coordinates for their location and updated them as they traveled around, resulting in a change in city location for the user. Some may have removed location information from their profiles. The populations are so small that these small shifts in normal user activity may have nothing to do with being a Raiders fan.

The independent user profile variables aside, the data appears to support a conclusion geography did not play a role in choosing to follow or not follow the team in response to the controversy. There might be small micropatterns at play. Of the four New Zealand cities where there was a difference, three saw a loss in followers for the team. This might be a bit misleading as four New Zealand cities saw no change in the total number of followers from them. Of the four cities that saw gains of five or more, all are large cities that are traditional league strong holds. Their increase is probably reflective of that reality, rather than as an increase in interest in the team because of the controversy. Geography does not appear to have played a role in Twitter users decision to follow or not follow the team in response to the Monaghan situation.

On Twitter, people follow accounts that are of interest to them. This can be seen as a positive expression of interest in the club as people are unlikely to follow groups or organizations they despise. By measuring comparative growth patterns, we can begin to see if the scandal had an impact on the Raider’s Twitter follower fanbase. As the official team account has not mentioned the controversy and the Raiders have not changed their Twitter practices in response to this controversy, the official account content can be excluded as a variable for growth; the Raiders have not used the situation to try to leverage their fanbase. Given that, Table 2 shows the total follower counts by date for the Raiders compared to the official accounts for the Manly Sea Eagles, Gold Coast Titans, New Zealand Warriors and Melbourne Storm.

Table 2

Total Twitter Followers: Raiders, Eagles, Titans, Warriors, Storm

Date collected
Raiders

Canberra


Manly

seaeagles


GCTitans

Thenz

warriors


Melb

StormRLC

9-Mar-10
202

888

1,616

434

458
30-May-10
375

1,129

2,052

521


1,124
5-Jun-10
389
19-Jun-10
417

1,215
21-Jun-10

424


1,203

2,176

565

1,226
29-Jul-10
608

1,338

2,447

614

1,473

13-Sep-10


841

1,705

3,011

884

1,942
14-Sep-10
870
15-Sep-10
873

1,726

3,036

756

1,983
4-Oct-10

949


1,842

3,274

763

2,222
6-Nov-10
1,071

1,963

3,513

884

2,504

Difference: October 4

- November 6


122

121

239

121

282

The controversy did not appear to create a spike in new followers for the Canberra Raiders. The total number of new followers for the most recent period available with the data suggests that the total number of new followers for the Raiders is in line with other teams with similar follow totals.

Beyond user follow patterns, it is sometimes useful to look at content. The geographic location of Tweets is one method of looking at tweets. There is a tool called Tribalytics that allows this to be done. Tribalytics maintains a list of over 200,000 Australian based Twitter users, sorted by state. Tribalytics allows users to search for a word or phrase on Twitter and adds up the total number of people who tweeted using it by state. This data can then be visualized over time. Table 3 uses data provided by Tribalytics to show the total number of tweets that mention Monaghan.

Table 3

Tribalytics: Tweets that mention Monaghan by state

State Monaghan
3-Nov

4-Nov

5-Nov
Australian Capital Territory

Tweets


1

41

44
Users

1


31

29
New South Wales Tweets
7

286

191
Users
7

203

152
Northern Territory Tweets
0

2

3

Users
0

2

3
Queensland Tweets
3

154

69
Users
2

80

57
South Australia

Tweets


0

25

9
Users

0


18

7
Tasmania Tweets
0

5

1
Users
0

3

1
Victoria Tweets
0

164

87

Users
0

122

79
Western Australia Tweets
0

16

21
Users
0

10

19
Total

Tweets


11

694

428
Users

10


470

350

The geographic location of the Tweets that mention Monaghan suggests that the controversy had the biggest audience in New South Wales, one of rugby league’s traditional strongholds. The situation in regards to Queensland and Victoria is interesting. Victoria has a much larger population than Queensland. Thus, it is not surprising that the total number of Twitterers and Tweets from Victoria is larger than Queensland. On the other hand, Victoria is not a rugby league stronghold; Queensland is. Logically, it would seem that this story should be bigger in Queensland but it isn’t. Interpreting what this means in a practical sense is difficult. The best conclusion is that this story will not help the NRL’s attempt to expand into Victoria, as fans are more aware of negative news regarding players and the league. On the other hand, for the traditional stronghold of Queensland, the controversy is not as interesting to the local population so there should be less risk in terms of attempting to grow the fan community for the NRL in the state.

The last major method for analyzing Twitter given a controversy like this is to examine the other words used in Tweets that include the word Monaghan. This can be done using Tribalytics, which provides a table that includes a list of the most popular words used in tweets mentioning a term and the percentage of time that the word is included in a Tweet involving a specific keyword. Table 4 was generated using Tribalytics and the keyword Monaghan.

Table 4

Popular words used in Tweets mentioning Monaghan

Word Inclusion Word Inclusion Word Inclusion
monaghan 87.31% sex 2.79%

#doggate


2.03%
joel 73.10% worse 2.54% wrong
1.78%
dog 21.32% monday

2.54%

today
1.78%
#nrl 9.64% trending 2.28% clear
1.78%
photo 8.88%

talking

2.28% bad
1.78%
raiders 6.85% sticking 2.28% takes
1.52%
#bonegate

6.60%

dangers 2.28% sexual
1.52%
canberra 6.09% club 2.28% room
1.52%

dogs

5.33% ve 2.03% qantas
1.52%
statement 5.08% social 2.03% mad

1.52%

nrl 5.08% sack 2.03% jokes
1.52%
news 4.57% releases 2.03%

guess


1.52%
twitter 3.30% player 2.03% bulldogs
1.52%
sacked 3.30% mr

2.03%

blew
1.52%
wow 3.05% danger 2.03% barking
1.52%
sick 3.05%

agent

2.03% admits
1.52%
breaking 3.05% #rugbyleague 2.03% #thatpicture
1.52%

This table suggests good things for the NRL and the Canberra Raiders. While people are discussing Monaghan and a lot of them are mentioning the dog, only 9.64% mention the NRL and even fewer Tweets reference that Monaghan plays for the Canberra Raiders. Based on Tweets, people are not necessarily associating the controversy with the NRL and the Raiders. Things may not be as bad as they could be for both organizations in terms of what Australians are choosing to focus on.

Overall on Twitter, the controversy involving Joel Monaghan has been rather neutral for the Raiders and the NRL. The Canberra Raiders did not see a mass defecting of followers. Those that did leave were geographically distributed so there was not a geographic area that responded particularly badly. Outside of New South Wales, most of the tweets came from an area where the NRL is not strong: The NRL should not lose strength in their traditional strongholds. The controversy may hurt their ability to push into Victoria as it may reaffirm negative opinions about rugby league. When people are tweeting about Monaghan, they are rarely connecting it to the Raiders and the NRL. While Twitter suggests not all-good news, things could be much, much worse in terms of the respective fanbases.

Facebook

Facebook is the most popular social networks in Australia. According to Alexa, the site ranks as the second most popular web site in the country. (Alexa Internet, Inc., 2010) According to Facebook’s “What do you want to advertise?” page on November 6, 2010, the site has 9,530,800 users from Australia. The site probably has more Australian sport fans on it than any other site in Australia. This is because a lot of the users are fans of the fan pages run by Australian sport leagues, clubs and athletes. Several of these official fan pages have well over 100,000 fans.

Given the large number of Australians using the network, the official presence of so many clubs and the amount of media attention paid to the service, a response to the Monaghan controversy was inevitable. Given the timing of the writing of this paper, there are two methods that can be used to measure the impact of the Joel Monaghan controversy on the Canberra Raiders’ fanbase on Facebook. The first way is to see if there has been a demographic shift in fans of the Canberra Raiders using Facebook’s advertising page data. The second is to measure the relative growth in the number of followers for the Raiders compared to other NRL teams. The third is to look at total and nature of the groups and fan pages created about Monaghan. As group and fan page size had not been recorded earlier, it is impossible to compare their growth like was done in the Akermanis paper.

Facebook’s advertising buy page provides demographic information about Facebook users in order to help advertisers target specific audiences. This information can be found at https://www.facebook.com/ads/create/ and is the easiest method of accessing publicly available demographic data on Facebook. On November 5 and November 6, 2010, the number of Canberra Raiders fans were recorded that lived in Australia, in New South Wales and in the ACT. During this 24-hour period, there was no change in the size of these groups. Data regarding various demographic groups for the Canberra Raiders was also collected on June 16 and November 6, 2010. It can be found in Table 5. The gap between data collection periods is large and covers a period where a player was suspended for drink driving and the Canberra Raiders finals run.

Table 5

Facebook data regarding Canberra Raiders fan demographics

Age

Sex Education Relation Interested in
16-Jun-10

6-Nov-10

Difference: Jun 16 to Nov 6
All All All

All

All
7,980

8,940

960
All Men All All All
5,400

6,000

600
All Women All All

All


2,460

2,800

340
All Women All All Women
140

160

20
All Women All All Men

1,000


1,000

0
All Women All Married Men
200

160

-40

All

Women All Single Men
260

420

160
All Women All

In a relationship

Men
320

220

-100
All Women All Engaged Men
400

< 20

#VALUE!
All Men All All

Men


60

< 20

#VALUE!
All

Men

All All Women
3,060

3,420

360
All Men All Married

Women


440

560

120
All Men All Single Women
1,340

1,520

180
All Men All In a relationship Women

700


620

-80
All Men All Engaged Women
180

140

-40

All

All College grads All All
1,060

1,120

60
All All University of Canberra

All

All
180

160

-20
All All ANU All All
120

40

-80
All All University of Melbourne All

All


< 20

< 20

0
All All In College All All
160

160

0
All All In High School All

All


220

220

0

During this period, the number of engaged female fans engaged to men dropped to almost zero. The number of women interested in men who were married or in a relationship also dropped. The number of engaged male fans engaged to males also dropped. While it is unlikely that the controversy caused these population shifts, it is possible contributor as the Canberra Raiders may have had a net gain of zero but lost old followers and gained new followers.

The response to a controversy can also be looked at by examining the comparative growth of a team to other teams in a league. If fans connect the problem to the team, they may punish a team by removing their like or not liking the fan page at the same rate that fans of other teams like their fan page. Table 6 shows the comparative growth of the Canberra Raiders official Facebook page to other teams for the period between July 30 and November 6, 2010.

Table 6

NRL official team fan page growth

Team Name Type

30-Jul-10


6-Nov-10
Difference % Difference
Melbourne Storm Storm Man User
4,986

4,799

-187

-3.90%

Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles

Manly-Warringah Sea Eagles Page
20,241

25,401

5,160

20.31%
Newcastle Knights Newcastle Knights Page
16,470

20,775


4,305

20.72%
Canberra Raiders Canberra Raiders User
3,413

4,495

1,082

24.07%
Cronulla-Sutherland Sharks

Cronulla Sharks

Page
11,230

14,792

3,562

24.08%
Canberra Raiders Canberra Raiders Sports Team
6,269

8,292

2,023


24.40%
North Queensland Cowboys North Queensland Toyota Cowboys Page
3,208

4,279

1,071

25.03%
Brisbane Broncos Brisbane Broncos

Page


83,157

117,246

34,089

29.07%
Gold Coast Titans Gold Coast Titans Page
25,714

39,237

13,523

34.46%
Canberra Raiders Canberra Raiders Sports Team
1,255

1,945

690


35.48%
Wests Tigers Wests Tigers – Official National Rugby League Club Page
19,355

31,691

12,336

38.93%
Sydney Roosters The Official Sydney Roosters Page

Page


15,362

27,890

12,528

44.92%

The Canberra Raiders are listed three times because they have three official accounts: A user page and two fan pages. Thus, it is a little hard to make good comparisons as each experienced different growth levels. The time period is also a long one, which includes a drink-driving incident involving a player and the club’s finals run. That said, if the controversy did have an impact on short term growth, it is not readily apparent or a big one as the three Canberra accounts are not on either extreme for percentage growth. It is unlikely that the controversy had an impact on the club’s Facebook fan growth. It may still yet but that will require waiting to see if the controversy continues for another few weeks.

Facebook makes it easy to create groups and fan pages and many people do in response to controversies. One example of this is the Jason Akermanis controversy, where fifteen anti-groups were created within three days of the story breaking. Many of these groups had names that questioned his intelligence and had names that implied criticism of his views on homosexuality. By day four of the controversy, the largest group had over 540 fans. The Joel Monaghan Facebook group and fan page creation situation is similar to that of Akermanis in that fifteen groups and pages had been included. The difference is that the membership was much smaller. The top likes for an anti-Joel page is 127. The titles of the Monaghan groups also contrast to that of Akermanis in that there is not implied condemnation of zoophilia and animal abuse. The group names also do not appear to criticize his intelligence. Rather, the names involve jokes about dogs. Table 7 gives an idea as to the nature of these groups and their size as of November 6, 2010.

Table 7

Size of Joel Monaghan related Facebook group and fan pages

Name Total members

Type

Joel Monaghan
119
Page
i deserve to play for NSW.. LOL jk im Joel Monaghan

6

Page
Joel monaghan = SICK FUCK
30
Group

Joel Monaghan Appreciation Group


135
Group
give joel monaghan a brake
8
Group
Joel Monaghan… one sick puppy!
2
Group
JOEL MONAGHAN IS A FILTHY BASTARD
2
Group
Joel Monaghan, “Go the dogs!!” 2010.
127
Group
I dont screw dogs jks im joel monaghan :L
22
Group
I hate playing the Bulldogs LOL JKS I’m Joel Monaghan
7
Group
That awkward moment when Joel Monaghan offers to walk your dog
33
Group
Joel Monaghan… Stay the F**K away from my dog!!!
37

Group

I think joel monaghan misstated his wife with his dog
1
Group
The Awkward moment when Joel Monaghan plays the Bulldogs

7

Group
joel monaghan… hate to get sucked off by a dog :/
7
Group

The Awkwardness when Joel Monaghan is Caught in a room with a dog…


5
Group
awkward moment when you walk in on joel monaghan copping head off a dog..
101
Group
lets take the dog for a walk, LOL JK im Joel Monaghan lets fuck it instead
8
Group
Joel Monaghan Loves Dogs…….. No I Mean He Really Loves Them……
2
Group

Against the backdrop of the Jason Akermanis situation, this appears pretty favorable for the Raiders and the NRL. It could be concluded that the nature of these groups is a positive for the Canberra Raiders and the NRL in that the groups do not mention the Canberra Raiders. They do not imply an activation of a moralistic fan base that could be highly motivated to cause trouble for the team. These groups also have very little reach and show that many people are uninterested in joining even for a laugh.

While the available Facebook data for this section was sparse, what is available suggests that the Canberra Raiders did not lose a fan base because of Monaghan’s actions. The community that appeared left the Raiders was one that they weren’t specifically targeting such as gay men and women in relationships. Those who were expressing anger over the situation were not doing so from a troublesome moralistic position; rather, they were doing so from a less serious perspective involving cracking jokes about having sex with dogs. Like Twitter, the Facebook situation does not look particularly good but it could be much worse.

Wikipedia

Wikipedia is one of the first sources that many Australians turn to when a news story breaks. The articles on the site often provide useful background, contain brief useful summations of ongoing events and include links to find additional information. At the same time, Wikipedia is important because of its high search engine placement. While people may not be looking for Wikipedia articles, they may just stumble upon it because the result is the first or second one for the term they are searching for.

In terms of the Joel Monaghan controversy and Wikipedia, the easiest way to measure the controversy as it impacts the Canberra Raiders would be to compare the total page views and edits between the article about Monaghan and the one about the Raiders. If the controversy reflected more upon Monaghan than his team, the expectation is the page view spike would be higher for the player. This information was found at http://stats.grok.se/en/201011/Joel_Monaghan and http://stats.grok.se/en/201011/Canberra_Raiders and is visualized in Figure 5.

Figure 5. A visualize of the total number of article views using data from http://stats.grok.se/ .

In the two days prior to the story breaking, the Canberra Raider article had more views: 202 to 23 on November 1, 160 to 19 on November 2. The day that the story broke, the total article views were 984 for Monaghan’s and 162 for the Canberra Raiders’ article. At the onset, while people may have been aware that Monaghan’s actions took place during the Raiders’ Mad Monday event, they did not seek out additional information on the Raiders, like seeing if the Raiders article had a section on Mad Monday.

The Wikipedia article views data strongly suggest that people were less interested in the Canberra Raiders and more interested in Joel Monaghan. While the content on the Monaghan page includes many references to his playing for the Canberra Raiders, the page view data supports a conclusion that people were less interested in the team and their response to the controversy than they were interested in knowing what exactly Monaghan had done.

Another way of measuring interest in a topic on Wikipedia is to look at the article’s edit history. The history possibly provides two methods for analysis: Total edits per article that can be viewed as an active edit participation counter to the passive reading consumption. The other possible method would involve trying to determine the location of the edits made to both articles. The latter is possible if anonymous edits were geotagged using IP address information to establish the location. This would be useful because the Raiders are probably striving for a fan base in and around Canberra. If most negative edits are coming from inside Canberra, that would be more problematic in terms of maintaining a local fan base than if the edits were coming from outside of Australia or in Australian locations that are not traditional NRL bases. This type of analysis, while possible, is extremely unreliable; many programs that produce this information have conflicts with others in attempting to accurately identify the city that the IP address originated from. Because of these issues, that methodology will not be done in this article. The first is another matter and can easily done.

The article about Joel Monaghan was created on March 17, 2006. As of the November 5, there have been 213 total edits to the English language article about Joel Monaghan. Of these, 47 edits or 22% of all edits to the article were made on and between November 3 and November 5, dates when the story broke. There likely would have been more edits to the article except the article was locked from editing by anyone except sysops at 4:49 UTC/15:49 Canberra time on November 4. In contrast, the Canberra Raiders article saw an increase in edits but was never locked to prevent anyone from editing. Still, given the difficulties in editing, there are noticeable difference between editing volume that can be seen in Table 8.

Table 8

Total edits to Joel Monaghan and Canberra Raiders Wikipedia articles

Joel Monaghan Canberra Raiders

1-Nov

0

0

2-Nov

0

0

3-Nov

6

4

4-Nov

36

9

5-Nov

5

5

The volume of edits suggests that people were not as interested in putting information about Joel Monaghan in the Canberra Raiders article as they were in editing the article about Monaghan. The edit volume suggestions are supported by a critical reading of both articles, where the controversy is only mentioned on the article about Monaghan and not the article about the Canberra Raiders. This is good news for the Canberra Raiders because the Wikipedia article about the team appears high in Google rankings. The controversy is about Monaghan and not as much about the Raiders and their Mad Monday.

When all three things are looked at together, comparative article views, edits and content, the picture looks better for the Canberra Raiders. People visiting and contributing to Wikipedia who are interested in the situation are not as interested in the Canberra Raiders. The association between the two does not appear to be high.

Wikia

Wikia is a wiki company that hosts over a million wikis. These wikis can be created for free and about any topic that a person wants. There are several wikis on Wikia that have been created about Australian sport, including a wiki about the NRL that can be found at http://nrl.wikia.com/ . This wiki is very small and only has 23 articles. Since the controversy involving Monaghan started, there have been no edits to the wiki. The situation did not inspire any members of the large Wikia family to visit the wiki and create an article about the Canberra Raiders or Joel Monaghan. This could be read as another positive for the Canberra Raiders and the NRL as the situation did not active a dormant fan base to document the situation.

YouTube

YouTube is the largest video site online. It is also the second biggest search engine online. (Hill, 2008) It is a popular site for sport fans; several teams around the world for different sports capitalize on this by having their own official accounts including the Chicago Red Stars, Real Madrid, and Perth Glory. Beyond the presence of official team accounts, fans upload many videos. Fan videos can be music videos, news clips, and video blogs. The frequency of uploads is one way to determine interest in a club compared to other teams while a controversy is taking place. A comparison between the Canberra Raiders and other NRL teams and clubs can be found in Table 9.

Table 9

Total search results on YouTube for NRL related keywords

Team

Keyword


21-Jun-10

24-Oct-10

7-Nov-10

Difference 21-Jun to 7-Nov

Difference 24-Oct to 7-Nov
Brisbane Broncos “Brisbane Broncos”
520

525

534

14


9
Brisbane Broncos “Darren Lockyer”
198

187

194

-4

7
Canberra Raiders “Canberra Raiders”

274


403

422

148

19
Canberra Raiders “Joel Monaghan”
24
Gold Coast Titans “Gold Coast Titans”
260

302

303

43

1

Melbourne Storm

“Melbourne Storm”
925

889

891

-34

2
Parramatta Eels “Parramatta Eels”
485

527

538


53

11
Parramatta Eels “Timana Tahu”
36

31

31

-5

0
Wests Tigers

“Wests Tigers”


404

464

468

64

4

The total number of new videos uploaded between June 21 and November 7 that mentioned the Canberra Raiders is 148, about 80 more than any other team. There does not appear to be a clear reason for this as when the results are looked into to see what has been uploaded during this period, there is no major topic of interest, nor are all the videos being uploaded by one or two individuals. For the period between October 24 and November 7, the Canberra Raiders topped the table with 19 new videos. The next closest club is Parramatta with 11. It is highly likely that the increase in videos relates to the controversy, though not certain as the team had elevated video totals in the prior period when compared to other clubs.

Given the mixed conclusion from video totals over time, other YouTube variables need to be looked at. On November 5, a search result total of 20 was found for “Joel Monaghan”. By November 7, this had increased to 24. This suggests that as the controversy took off, there was a significant increase in interest about Joel Monaghan. A search on November 7 for “Canberra Raiders” “Joel Monaghan” had 10 results. This means that 41.7% of all videos that mentioned Monaghan also mentioned the team he was playing for on Mad Monday. It also means that only 2.3% of all videos that mention the Raiders also include a reference to Monaghan. If the 10 results are sorted by date, six were uploaded since the controversy broke. If only the Monaghan/Raiders videos that were uploaded between November 4 and November 7 are included, than 1.4% of all videos relate to it the controversy. Of the six videos that mention the Raiders and Monaghan, the least viewed video as of November 7 had 1,589 views. The most viewed video had 17,683 views. The average total views for these six videos was 6,352. This can be compared to the 4 videos uploaded prior to the controversy, where the least viewed had 788 views, the most viewed had 4,431 views and the average views was 2,406. The audience for the controversy-related videos was 2.6 times larger than the non-controversy videos.

The additional data does not really clarify the situation. The best conclusion that can be reached is that the Canberra Raiders had an already elevated audience of people uploading videos prior to the controversy. In the period around the controversy, if the six videos that mentioned the Raiders and Monaghan were removed, the Raiders would still be the top team for video uploads. The fan base continued to upload videos and these videos continued to be viewed but at a smaller rate than the videos referencing the controversy. On the whole though, YouTube data suggests that based on pure volume and established audience, the controversy will not have an adverse effect on the team’s fanbase because the controversy uploads represent a tiny segment of the content about them. There is not the quantity of videos about it that should be a long-term concern for the club in term of its image with their fanbase.

Yahoo!Groups

Mailing lists once were one of the most popular tools for Australian sport fans to use in order to communicate with each other. They were easy to create with hosts like egroups, coollists, topica, Yahoo!Groups and Google groups. Two such lists still exist for Canberra Raiders fans: raiders and raiders82, both found on Yahoo!Groups. In the case of raiders, the list has 9 members, open membership and open posting. There has not been a new post since 2003. The controversy did not activate Raiders fans in terms of encouraging them to post. raiders82 has closed membership, requiring that the moderator approve new members. It currently has 128 members. The list had no posts on it between March 2008 and October 2010. There was one new post in November 2010. As the archives are not publicly available, what the contents are is not entirely clear but it could be assumed that the controversy inspired a fan to be less dormant in their support of the club. All things said, the controversy did not inspire much activity on this particular service. It suggests that things are not so heinous as to encourage people to condemn the team they support.

Conclusion

The Joel Monaghan controversy is different than a number of the other sporting controversies that took place during the 2010 NRL and AFL seasons. There were not the moralistic and human rights related issues underpinning it like there were for the Akermanis controversy and the racism controversy during the State of Origin. There was not the harm or potential to cause harm and death that there were for the alleged sexual assault by a St Kilda player or the drink-driving situation by another Canberra rugby player. There were not the illegal actions like the St Kilda player and the Canberra Raiders player allegedly did. There was not the break of unstated football rules regarding the poaching of players from rugby to Aussie rules like there was for the Israel Folau code change controversy. There was not the issue of cheating and bringing unfairness to the game that the Melbourne Storm salary cap violations had. The lack of these issues probably underscores the reasons why fans behaved online such as they did. This was a drunken act in a culture that can understand and relate to someone engaging in drunken stupidity. If other structural issues to the controversy had been at play with a similar amount of media coverage, if the Raiders had been in a bigger market and if the player had been more famous, this might have played differently, as the author’s Akermanis and Melbourne Storm controversy articles demonstrate.

Beyond the underlying variables regarding the nature of the controversy, the results suggest that the Monagahn controversy did not adversely effect the Canberra Raiders fan base in that there were few numbers that suggest the player and the Raiders were inextricably linked. On the other hand, the club did not receive a benefit from the controversy in that it did not inspire Raider fans and Canberrans to show support of the club by following them on Twitter, fanning them on Facebook, or editing articles about the team on Wikipedia and Wikia. The amount of interest about the controversy expressed in YouTube views, Tweets and views to the Monaghan page on Wikipedia suggests that there might be underlying structural image issues in places like Victoria where the NRL wants to grow its fanbase. In the end, the controversy did not hurt the team, but it did not help them.


References

Alexa Internet, Inc. (2010, November 6). Facebook.com – site info from alexa. Retrieved from http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/facebook.com

Alexa Internet, Inc. (2010, November 6). Twitter.com – site info from alexa. Retrieved from http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/twitter.com

Dutton, C. (2010, November 6). Ultimatum to Raiders: sack Monaghan or risk sponsors. The Canberra Times, 1. Canberra.

Dutton, C., & Moloney, J. (2010, November 5). Disgraced Monaghan’s career on line as prank goes viral. The Canberra Times, 1. Canberra.

Hale, L. (2010, June 14). The impact of Jason Akermanis’s comments on the Western Bulldogs’s online fanbase. Ozzie Sport. Retrieved November 5, 2010, from http://ozziesport.com/2010/07/the-impact-of-jason-akermaniss-comments-on-the-western-bulldogss-online-fanbase/

Hale, L. (2010, May 20). Online activity in the wake of the Melbourne Storm controversy. Ozzie Sport. Retrieved November 5, 2010, from http://ozziesport.com/2010/05/online-activity-in-the-wake-of-the-melbourne-storm-controversy/

Henrik. (2010, November 6). Canberra Raiders. Wikipedia article traffic statistics. Retrieved November 6, 2010, from http://stats.grok.se/en/201011/Canberra_Raiders

Henrik. (2010, November 6). Joel Monaghan. Wikipedia article traffic statistics. Retrieved November 6, 2010, from http://stats.grok.se/en/201011/Joel_Monaghan

Hill, J. (2008, October 16). YouTube surpasses Yahoo as world’s #2 search engine. TG Daily. Retrieved October 24, 2010, from http://www.tgdaily.com/trendwatch-features/39777-youtube-surpasses-yahoo-as-world%E2%80%99s-2-search-engine

nrl scandal. (2010, November 6). Google Search. Retrieved November 5, 2010, from http://www.google.com.au/search?q=NRL+scandal

Proszenko, A. (2010, November 7). Monaghan quits NRL, Shamed Raider looks to UK. The Canberra Times, 1,3. Canberra.

Search Result | Tribalytic: Social Market Research Made Simple. (2010, November 6). Tribalytic. Retrieved November 6, 2010, from http://tribalytic.com/search/?q=Monaghan

What do you want to advertise? (2010, November 6). Facebook. Retrieved November 6, 2010, from https://www.facebook.com/ads/create/

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Online Activity in the Wake of the Melbourne Storm Controversy Revisited (incomplete)

Posted by Laura on Monday, 1 November, 2010

This isn’t actually fully revisited. I started writing this about a week ago and then have had extremely limited internet access. Given that, I thought I would post what I have so far and finish the rest later.


Online Activity in the Wake of the  Melbourne Storm Controversy Revisited (incomplete)

On April 22, 2010, the news of salary cap violations on the part of the Melbourne Storm broke online in such publications as the Fox Sports, on television including ABC news and on multiple social networks including Facebook and Twitter. By April 23, the news was available in various print publications including The Australian and the Sydney Morning Herald. During the news coverage, NRL fans learned that the team had been fined $1.8 million, stripped of two premiereships and were not eligible to earn points towards 2010’s premiership. (“Melbourne storm stripped,” 2010) The team was being punished for salary cap violations over the past five years, where the total cap violation in that period was $1.7 million with $400,000 of that total cap violation occurring in 2009. (“Melbourne storm stripped,” 2010)

The consensus at the time in the media was that this would hurt the team in terms of maintaining a fan base. In the three-week period after the news broke, this did not appear to be the case: The team maintained or grew its online fan community. In addition, there was more fan interactions in the Melbourne Storm fan community than there had been prior to the controversy. This defied conventional wisdom. The numbers deserve a followup to determine if the Melbourne Storm managed to capture short-term interest and translate it into long-term, season long, interest in the club.

This article will revisit numbers from May to determine how successful the club was. Specifically, interest patterns as expressed on networks like 43things, bebo, Facebook, LiveJournal and its clones, Twitter, Wikia, Wikiedia, Yahoo!Groups and YouTube. The article will prove that as the season progressed, interest in the Melbourne Storm declined relative to other teams in the National Rugby League.


43things

In the May analysis, a goal setting site called 43things was looked at. The site has a small group of Australians on it who have set professional sport related goals.

On April 1, 2010, the site was searched for any goals that connected to the Melbourne Storm. Only one goal related to the Melbourne Storm was found. It is “Go to a Melbourne Storm Game.” (1) Two people, erynne and mmcpharlane, had listed this as a goal they were working towards completing. When checked again on May 10 and October 24, no one had added any additional goals related to the Melbourne Storm. The two individuals who had listed “Go to a Melbourne Storm Game” remained the same.


Mailing lists

During much of the 1990s, mailing lists were one of the most popular tools for fans to use in order to communicate with each other. The creation of mailing lists became much easier when sites like egroups, coollists, topica, Yahoo!Groups and Google groups were created. In some corners of Australian sport fandom, mailing lists have played an important role in helping fans support their interest in clubs.

At one point, there was a semi-active community for the Melbourne Storm community on Yahoo!Groups. (2) When Melbourne Storm Yahoo!Groups were looked at in May, the controversy had no effect on the groups: No new content was posted on these lists. Only one (3) had new content posted between May and October; this new content was a generic newsletter that is sent out to several other NRL related lists and was not published specifically for this list. (4) There is no long tail effect of the club’s fan community on Yahoo!Groups as the community has long since moved on and the controversy didn’t activate a community that has largely been inactive since 2001.

YouTube

YouTube is the largest video site online. It is also the second biggest search engine online. (Hill, 2008) It is a popular site for sport fans; several teams around the world for different sports capitalize on this by having their own official accounts including the Chicago Red Stars (5), Real Madrid (6), and Perth Glory (7). Beyond the presence of official team accounts, fans upload many videos. Fan videos can be music videos, news clips, and video blogs. The frequency of uploads is one way to determine interest in a club.

When the original analysis was completed in May, it did not include YouTube data. Data was only gathered in June and October, several months after the controversy went down. In addition, the total upload data gathered only included a few teams: Brisbane Broncos, Canberra Raiders, Gold Coast Titans, Melbourne Storm, Parramatta Eels, and Wests Tigers. Despite the lack of pre-controversy data, interesting post controversy numbers were discovered.

Table 1
YouTube Video Search Results by Date and Keyword
Team Keyword 16-Jun-10 21-Jun-10 24-Oct-10 Difference: 16-Jun to 24-Oct Difference: 21-Jun to 24-Oct
Brisbane Broncos “Brisbane Broncos” 509

520

525 16 5
Melbourne Storm “Melbourne Storm” 910 925 889 -21 -36

Parramatta Eels

“Parramatta Eels” 479 485 527 48 42
Parramatta Eels “Timana Tahu” 36 36

31

-5 -5
Wests Tigers “Wests Tigers” 390 404 464 74 60
Canberra Raiders

“Canberra Raiders”

274 403 129
Gold Coast Titans “Gold Coast Titans” 260 302 42
Brisbane Broncos “Darren Lockyer” 198 187 187 -11

When compared to all other teams, the Melbourne Storm were the only team where the number of videos mentioning them decreased. The two players looked at both faced losses in the total number of videos that mentioned them. Like the Storm, both of these players were involved in a major controversy during the season.

There are likely three reasons that could be attributed to the decline in videos. The first is that YouTube removed the videos because of copyright issues. This is plausible and if it is the case, it may not be the fault of the Storm as many of the copyright disputes on YouTube involve the background music. Given the lack of discussion in the NRL community about YouTube crackdowns in terms of NRL content or music, this reason just seems unlikely. The second reason is the creators may have deleted their content and their videos. This feels more plausible. Many people delete their online content when they are job hunting, because they are embarrassed by it or because of privacy concerns. The third reason is that the uploader no longer likes the team: They do not want to be associated with them or embarrassed by their previous support of them. This reason seems the most plausible. In the context of the Melbourne Storm, it fits given the patterns with the individual rugby league players who endured major controversies. In actuality, the reduction in videos is probably a combination of the second and third reasons. If true, it suggests that controversies lead to a reduction in user-uploaded content and the deletion of existing material: The YouTube audience for the team contracts.

References

Hill, J. (2008, October 16). YouTube surpasses Yahoo as world’s #2 search engine. TG Daily. Retrieved October 24, 2010, from http://www.tgdaily.com/trendwatch-features/39777-youtube-surpasses-yahoo-as-world%E2%80%99s-2-search-engine

Melbourne storm stripped of two premierships for salary cap breach. (2010, April 22). Fox Sports, Retrieved from http://www.foxsports.com.au/story/0,8659,27022196-5018866,00.html

Footnotes

1. The page for the goal can be found at http://www.43things.com/things/view/2535563/go-to-a-melbourne-storm-game .
2.Yahoo!Groups is the most popular mailing list host.  Archives are also available for these lists.
The list was http://au.groups.yahoo.com/group/MelbourneStorm .
3.While these e-mails were generic to the National Rugby League and might be considered spam if they were posted on a list with a more active administrator, a few did mention the Melbourne Storm.  A few even referenced the controversy.  Because of the nature of the posts, these few posts were not counted.
4.The Chicago Red Stars official YouTube can be found at https://www.youtube.com/user/ChicagoRedStars .
5.Real Madrid’s official YouTube account can be found at https://www.youtube.com/user/realmadridcf .
6.Perth Glory’s official YouTube account can be found at https://www.youtube.com/user/PerthGloryTV .

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Data dump: Australian sport on YouTube

Posted by Laura on Monday, 25 October, 2010

This is another data dump. I have been getting data for these data dumps to begin to get an idea as to the size and shape of the various communities on these networks. In several cases, I have demographic data from earlier dates related to these networks. I can compare who is uploading and contributing if the numbers differ. For smaller data sets, I can compare to see if the membership changed: James left but John joined.


League Team Interest Videos Date gathered
AFL Adelaide Crows Adelaide Crows 909 16-Jun-10
AFL Adelaide Crows Adelaide Crows 915 21-Jun-10
AFL Adelaide Crows Adelaide Crows 999 24-Oct-10
AFL Brisbane Lions Brisbane Lions 587 16-Jun-10
AFL Brisbane Lions Brisbane Lions 594 21-Jun-10
AFL Brisbane Lions Brisbane Lions 682 24-Oct-10
AFL Carlton Blues Carlton Blues 531 16-Jun-10
AFL Carlton Blues Carlton Blues 532 21-Jun-10
AFL Carlton Blues Carlton Blues 576 24-Oct-10
AFL Collingwood Magpies Collingwood Magpies 828 16-Jun-10
AFL Collingwood Magpies Collingwood Magpies 841 21-Jun-10
AFL Collingwood Magpies Collingwood Magpies 1,060 24-Oct-10
AFL Essendon Bombers Essendon Bombers 484 16-Jun-10
AFL Essendon Bombers Essendon Bombers 499 21-Jun-10
AFL Essendon Bombers Essendon Bombers 556 24-Oct-10
AFL Fremantle Dockers Fremantle Dockers 329 16-Jun-10
AFL Fremantle Dockers Fremantle Dockers 340 21-Jun-10
AFL Fremantle Dockers Fremantle Dockers 421 24-Oct-10
AFL Geelong Cats Geelong Cats 583 16-Jun-10
AFL Geelong Cats Geelong Cats 585 21-Jun-10
AFL Geelong Cats Geelong Cats 764 24-Oct-10
AFL Gold Coast Football Club Gold Coast Football Club 11 16-Jun-10
AFL Gold Coast Football Club Gold Coast Football Club 11 21-Jun-10
AFL Gold Coast Football Club Karmichael Hunt 74 21-Jun-10
AFL Gold Coast Football Club Gold Coast Football Club 16 24-Oct-10
AFL Gold Coast Football Club Israel Folau 76 24-Oct-10
AFL Gold Coast Football Club Karmichael Hunt 65 24-Oct-10
AFL Gold Coast Football Club Gold Coast Suns 51 24-Oct-10
AFL Greater Western Sydney Israel Folau 99 16-Jun-10
AFL Greater Western Sydney Greater Western Sydney 9 16-Jun-10
AFL Greater Western Sydney Greater Western Sydney 9 21-Jun-10
AFL Greater Western Sydney Israel Folau 102 21-Jun-10
AFL Greater Western Sydney Israel Folau 79 24-Oct-10
AFL Greater Western Sydney Greater Western Sydney 16 24-Oct-10
AFL Hawthorn Hawks Hawthorn Hawks 605 16-Jun-10
AFL Hawthorn Hawks Hawthorn Hawks 616 21-Jun-10
AFL Hawthorn Hawks Hawthorn Hawks 736 24-Oct-10
AFL Melbourne Demons Melbourne Demons 250 16-Jun-10
AFL Melbourne Demons Melbourne Demons 249 21-Jun-10
AFL Melbourne Demons Melbourne Demons 289 24-Oct-10
AFL North Melbourne Kangaroos North Melbourne Kangaroos 160 16-Jun-10
AFL North Melbourne Kangaroos North Melbourne Kangaroos 159 21-Jun-10
AFL North Melbourne Kangaroos North Melbourne Kangaroos 178 24-Oct-10
AFL Port Adelaide Power Port Adelaide Power 227 16-Jun-10
AFL Port Adelaide Power Port Adelaide Power 225 21-Jun-10
AFL Port Adelaide Power Port Adelaide Power 274 24-Oct-10
AFL Richmond Tigers Richmond Tigers 412 16-Jun-10
AFL Richmond Tigers Richmond Tigers 411 21-Jun-10
AFL Richmond Tigers Richmond Tigers 462 24-Oct-10
AFL St. Kilda Saints St. Kilda Saints 273 16-Jun-10
AFL St. Kilda Saints St. Kilda Saints 267 21-Jun-10
AFL St. Kilda Saints St. Kilda Saints 411 24-Oct-10
AFL Sydney Swans Sydney Swans 697 16-Jun-10
AFL Sydney Swans Sydney Swans 720 21-Jun-10
AFL Sydney Swans Sydney Swans 861 24-Oct-10
AFL West Coast Eagles West Coast Eagles 785 16-Jun-10
AFL West Coast Eagles West Coast Eagles 789 21-Jun-10
AFL West Coast Eagles West Coast Eagles 871 24-Oct-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Western Bulldogs 812 16-Jun-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Jason Akermanis 131 16-Jun-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Western Bulldogs 612 16-Jun-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Jason Akermanis 127 16-Jun-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Jason Akermanis 128 21-Jun-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Western Bulldogs 615 21-Jun-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Western Bulldogs 670 21-Jul-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Jason Akermanis 135 21-Jul-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Western Bulldogs 974 24-Oct-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Jason Akermanis 114 24-Oct-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Western Bulldogs 753 24-Oct-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Jason Akermanis 111 24-Oct-10
AFL Western Bulldogs Jason Akermanis 111 24-Oct-10
AFL Canberra Ainslie Football Club Ainslie Football Club 5 16-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Ainslie Football Club Ainslie Football Club 5 21-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Ainslie Football Club Ainslie Football Club 10 24-Oct-10
AFL Canberra Belconnen Magpies Belconnen Magpies 4 16-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Belconnen Magpies Belconnen Magpies 4 21-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Belconnen Magpies Belconnen Magpies 6 24-Oct-10
AFL Canberra Eastlake Football Club Eastlake Football Club 2 16-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Eastlake Football Club Eastlake Football Club 2 21-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Eastlake Football Club Eastlake Football Club 10 24-Oct-10
AFL Canberra Queanbeyan Tigers Queanbeyan Tigers 3 16-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Queanbeyan Tigers Queanbeyan Tigers 3 21-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Queanbeyan Tigers Queanbeyan Tigers 13 24-Oct-10
AFL Canberra Sydney Swans Reserves Sydney Swans Reserves 30 16-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Sydney Swans Reserves Sydney Swans Reserves 30 21-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Sydney Swans Reserves Sydney Swans Reserves 30 24-Oct-10
AFL Canberra Tuggeranong Hawks Tuggeranong Hawks 4 16-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Tuggeranong Hawks Tuggeranong Hawks 4 21-Jun-10
AFL Canberra Tuggeranong Hawks Tuggeranong Hawks 14 24-Oct-10
AHL Canberra Labor Club Lakers Canberra Labor Club Lakers 0 16-Jun-10
AHL Canberra Labor Club Lakers Canberra Labor Club Lakers 10 24-Oct-10
AHL New South Wales Waratahs New South Wales Waratahs 3 16-Jun-10
AHL New South Wales Waratahs New South Wales Waratahs 9 24-Oct-10
AHL NT Stingers NT Stingers 0 16-Jun-10
AHL NT Stingers NT Stingers 10 24-Oct-10
AHL Queensland Blades Queensland Blades 1 16-Jun-10
AHL Queensland Blades Queensland Blades 10 24-Oct-10
AHL Southern Hotshots Southern Hotshots 3 16-Jun-10
AHL Southern Hotshots Southern Hotshots 10 24-Oct-10
AHL Tassie Tigers Tassie Tigers 2 16-Jun-10
AHL Tassie Tigers Tassie Tigers 12 24-Oct-10
AHL Victoria Vikings Victoria Vikings 1 16-Jun-10
AHL Victoria Vikings Victoria Vikings 11 24-Oct-10
AHL WA Thundersticks WA Thundersticks 0 16-Jun-10
AHL WA Thundersticks WA Thundersticks 10 24-Oct-10
A-League Melbourne Victory Melbourne Victory 2,470 16-Jun-10
A-League Melbourne Victory Melbourne Victory 2,590 24-Oct-10
Basketball Australia Australian Boomers Australian Boomers 98 14-May-10
Basketball Australia Australian Boomers Australian Boomers 104 24-Oct-10
Basketball Australia Australian Opals Australian Opals 538 14-May-10
Basketball Australia Australian Opals Australian Opals 220 24-Oct-10
First class cricket NSW Blues NSW Blues 83 16-Jun-10
First class cricket NSW Blues NSW Blues 78 24-Oct-10
NRL Brisbane Broncos Brisbane Broncos 509 16-Jun-10
NRL Brisbane Broncos Brisbane Broncos 520 21-Jun-10
NRL Brisbane Broncos Darren Lockyer 198 21-Jun-10
NRL Brisbane Broncos Brisbane Broncos 525 24-Oct-10
NRL Brisbane Broncos Darren Lockyer 187 24-Oct-10
NRL Canberra Raiders Canberra Raiders 274 21-Jun-10
NRL Canberra Raiders Canberra Raiders 403 24-Oct-10
NRL Gold Coast Titans Gold Coast Titans 260 21-Jun-10
NRL Gold Coast Titans Gold Coast Titans 302 24-Oct-10
NRL Melbourne Storm Melbourne Storm 910 16-Jun-10
NRL Melbourne Storm Melbourne Storm 925 21-Jun-10
NRL Melbourne Storm Melbourne Storm 889 24-Oct-10
NRL Parramatta Eels Timana Tahu 36 16-Jun-10
NRL Parramatta Eels Parramatta Eels 480 16-Jun-10
NRL Parramatta Eels Parramatta Eels 479 16-Jun-10
NRL Parramatta Eels Timana Tahu 36 21-Jun-10
NRL Parramatta Eels Parramatta Eels 485 21-Jun-10
NRL Parramatta Eels Timana Tahu 31 24-Oct-10
NRL Parramatta Eels Parramatta Eels 527 24-Oct-10
NRL Wests Tigers Wests Tigers 390 16-Jun-10
NRL Wests Tigers Wests Tigers 404 21-Jun-10
NRL Wests Tigers Wests Tigers 464 24-Oct-10
Rugby World Cup All Blacks All Blacks 13,200 14-May-10
Rugby World Cup All Blacks All Blacks 5,170 24-Oct-10
State of Origin Queensland Maroons Queensland Maroons 34 16-Jun-10
State of Origin Queensland Maroons Queensland Maroons 41 24-Oct-10
W-League Canberra United Canberra United 43 16-Jun-10
W-League Canberra United Canberra United 39 24-Oct-10
W-League Melbourne Victory W-League Melbourne Victory 18 2-Jul-10
W-League Melbourne Victory +W-League +Melbourne Victory 18 2-Jul-10
W-League Melbourne Victory W-League Melbourne Victory 14 24-Oct-10
W-League Melbourne Victory +W-League +Melbourne Victory 14 24-Oct-10
W-League W-League W-League 299 2-Jul-10
W-League W-League W-League 357 24-Oct-10
World Cup Soccer All Whites All Whites 429 14-May-10
World Cup Soccer All Whites All Whites 607 16-Jun-10
World Cup Soccer All Whites All Whites 810 24-Oct-10
World Cup Soccer Socceroos Socceroos 1,760 14-May-10
World Cup Soccer Socceroos Socceroos 2,080 16-Jun-10
World Cup Soccer Socceroos Socceroos 2,290 24-Oct-10

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Video: ACT for Team Greater Western Sydney

Posted by Laura on Friday, 10 September, 2010

This is another video I made.  (By made, I created it using Microsoft Paint, PowerPoint and Windows Video Maker.)  It is a really crude appeal to patriotism and local community identity.  I don’t suppose anyone could make a better video, have it go viral, prove that social media has value for Team GWS (and that they should control it rather than the fans) and most importantly: Get Team GWS to the ACT?

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Post #ausvotes analysis and commentary

Posted by Laura on Sunday, 22 August, 2010

The last post? It leads me to believe that you cannot use tweet volume by electorate to predict the outcome of that electorate’s voting. In most cases, the sample sizes were just too small: 1 to 10 tweets. There might have been more tweets coming out from that electorate but they weren’t using party names, acronyms or the names of the major party leaders. An already small sample of say 50 tweets from an electorate could be whittled down to 5. (I could go back and redo that, try to get more tweets, include post election tweets and see if the results changed… but I’m not certain the point. If some one gives me an incentive to do that though, it will be done.) Twitter doesn’t appear to have any meaningful predictive value on that level… or even on a broader level (where Labor was mentioned almost twice as often as the Liberals. The best suggestion could be that the overall trend is that Labor and Green supporters engage in the usage of social media more than their Liberal, National and Family First counterparts.)

That said, I still want to analyze these patterns. I generally avoid content analysis but this is interesting and some what relevant to an important topic. (Will Tony Abbott win and adversely effect my desire to stay in the country post graduation? How will the elections impact the country’s spending and the value of the USD, which I rely on to pay my bills in Australia?) I asked an acquaintance what analysis she would like and she suggested sentiment analysis post election results. (Are people on Twitter happy with the results?) I’m not a fan of sentiment analysis for a variety of reasons… It isn’t easy to do and is rarely accurate. The easiest way to do that would probably involve letting people judge the attitude of Twitter folks towards the election based on the most popular #ausvotes related hashtags.

To do this, I went to searchtastic and searched and searched like I did before (using the following searches: #ausvotes, #asuvotes, gillard, abbott, greens house, greens senate, #sexparty, #familyfirst, #nbn, #campaignbender, ranga julia, #vote9, #hungparliament, hung oz, #auslabor, Australian sex party, #9votes, #laborfail, #myliberal, Joe Hockey, tony julia, Maxine McKew, Wyatt Roy, wilson tuckey, Stephen Fielding, Steven Conroy, bob brown) . I found over 10,000 total tweets using these searches. I then removed all tweets that were posted before Aug 21 2010, 0:00 UTC. This time would be 21 August 2010, 10:00 AM Canberra time. People had started voting by then and most of the election vote getting had been done. That done, I had 7,985 total tweets. The next step was to remove all duplicate tweets. The tweet total is 3,372, which looks like a pretty decent sample size.

After that, I extracted all the #hashtags from these tweets. These 3,372 tweets had 4,354 #hashtags used in them. There were 420 unique #hashtags. The table below is a count of the most popular #hashtags used after Aug 21 2010, 0:00 UTC where the tag was used at least twice:

#tcot 5
#84 4
#Adelaide 4
#alp 4
#ausvote 4
#conroy 4
#hunglikeaparliament 4
#ope 4
#politics 4
#Quote 4
#ReTweetThisIf 4
#sausagesizzle 4
#votelabor 4
#VoteLiberal 4
#win 4
#wisdom 4
#zing 4
#60 3
#aflhawksfreo 3
#australia 3
#Australian 3
#australianlabor 3
#ausvoted 3
#climate 3
#disability 3
#dontfriskabbott 3
#dontriskRabbit 3
#electiondrinkinggames 3
#electionWire 3
#F1 3
#grayndler 3
#greensaresocialists 3
#hungover 3
#music 3
#nocleanfeed 3
#nowbuggeroff 3
#topend 3
#unintentionallyironic 3
#6RAR 2
#Abbottalypse 2
#abc1 2
#Amnesty 2
#antonygreenfacts 2
#auseats 2
#auselectoralfraud 2
#ausvotes 2
#awunion 2
#Breaking 2
#ChangeTheGovernment 2
#dawson 2
#dontbothertrying 2
#electionnightcocktail 2
#EPICFAIL 2
#fraser 2
#hescute 2
#ifabbotwins 2
#juliagillard 2
#keysinthefishbowl 2
#LA 2
#labour 2
#lol 2
#losers 2
#masterchef 2
#Melbourne 2
#NBNfail 2
#Note2Females 2
#ozelection 2
#ozlog 2
#p2 2
#Perth 2
#qanda 2
#Qld 2
#rejectedpartynames 2
#retweet 2
#rippedoff 2
#sadbuttrue 2
#SausageSizzles 2
#sbspoll 2
#senate 2
#tallyroom 2
#TeamAmerica 2
#Tehran 2
#travel 2
#truly 2
#TT 2
#twexitpoll 2
#uc 2
#UN 2
#votingpetpeeves 2
#VXToronto 2
#WAfirst 2
#waystoresolvehungparliament 2
#wellhung 2
#wellhungparliament 2
#westwing 2
#wewannaknow 2
#whitsundays 2
#whoneedsdrugs 2
#winwithgodwin 2
#workforitabbott 2
#WorldChampsPosse 2
#WTF 2
#Wyatt2035 2
#xxx 2
#youhaveapotatoforachin 2
#YouKnowYoureInAustralia 2
#zow 2

Is there any sentiment being expressed by people interested in the Australian elections that you could take away from this? Probably not. The extent to which I’d say any attitude is being expressed is that people do not want Abbott to come out on top and that they blame Labor for this failure of having a clear victor and functional government. It could also possibly be read that people are concerned about the impact of the elections on Internet censorship and infrastructure in Australia. (Though #nocleanfeed could refer to the Wikileaks story. People often use that #hashtag to discuss the site.) Marriage equality and civil rights are viewed as being a post election concern. And I suppose you could also conclude that Australians are keeping their sense of humor about themselves with their use of various puns and sexual references.

Rather than do another post, I’ve decided to tack on a list of URLs that were mentioned. From that same list of 3,372 tweets, there were 516 total urls included in the tweet. 297 of them were “unique.” (I haven’t lengthened all of the URLs so there may be a few repeats using url shorteners that I can’t easily lengthen.) The following URLs were the ones that were all mentioned five or more times:

Tweets Count
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQ_s6V1Kv6A&amp;feature=player_embedded 48
http://youtu.be/RQ_s6V1Kv6A 29
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQ_s6V1Kv6A 26
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQ_s6V1Kv6A&amp; 11
hotfile.com/dl/63200434/385dec4/Inception.DIVX.DVD.QUALITY.wmv.html 8
LATENIGHTLOCALS.TK 8
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=6908926&amp;fbid=462135946202&amp;op=1&amp;o=global&amp;view=global&amp;subj=106582159380758&amp;id=540506202 8
http://www.abc.net.au/news/abcnews24/ 7
http://au.news.yahoo.com/a/-/latest/7799523/candidate-may-become-youngest-pollie/ 6
http://alp.org.au/special-pages/compare-julia-gillard-tony-abbott-policies/ 5
http://twitpic.com/2gsip7 5
http://yfrog.com/f1p53hj 5

It is an interesting selection of links: YouTube, Facebook, ABC news, Yahoo News, Labor’s website, TwitPic, and YFrog (a picture). The only really official content is that from Labor. Despite the #hashtag popularity of the Sex Party, people weren’t linking to them. People also weren’t linking to Get!Up content on their site. They weren’t linking to other official party content. The message in this case is clearly in control of voters and the media, not the parties.

Anyone have any more suggestions for what to write about in terms of the Australian elections before I go back to sport?

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How to sell GWS to the ACT…

Posted by Laura on Tuesday, 20 July, 2010

This isn’t particularly high quality. I made it using Microsoft Paint, PowerPoint and Windows Movie Maker. It is good for a giggle. :)

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An interview with Ben Pollack from the Canberra Raiders

Posted by Laura on Thursday, 24 June, 2010

On Wednesday, June 23, 2010, I had the pleasure of talking to Ben Pollack and another staff member at the Canberra Raider.  I really appreciated the opportunity to talk to them as it was provided additional insight into how sport clubs view fandom and social media. I’ve tried to convey as accurately as possible what they have told me based on my memory and I asked their permission to reference them in my blog and paper while I met with them.

If you’re not familiar with the Canberra Raiders, they are a Rugby League team that competes at the top level in the National Rugby League in Australia.  They are based in Australia’s capital, Canberra, and play their home games at Bruce Stadium.  The NRL has a profit sharing scheme, where revenues are shared between all teams.

My purpose in talking to them was to help provide background knowledge for my literature review and to generally enhance my understanding of Australian team sport as it may apply other parts of my research.  Going in, I had four questions I wanted answers to.  These questions were:

1. How do you define fandom?
2. How do you reach out to the fan community?
3. How much influence does league management provide in terms of defining fandom and how to engage in outreach?  Do they give guidance on social media policies?
4. How much do other sports, teams and leagues play a role in development and implementation of concepts related to fan engagement and social media?

The Canberra Raiders define fandom very broadly as people who barrack for them and who attend games.  Their goal is to have this definition encompass all ages, both genders and across the demographic spectrum.  They focus on the Canberra area. They want to take interest in the club and translate that into getting people into the stadium, with bums on seats.  They did not mention trying to get fans to watch on television or buy their merchandise.  It may be something that they define as fandom but I did not follow up to ask about that.

When I inquired about the regional aspect in the NRL helping teams by enabling them to develop a local fanbase, they said that this worked a lot in their favor as the Canberra area was very supportive of the team.  This may not be as true for some of the Sydney based teams where there is much more market overlap and a few teams play at the same venue.  There, clubs need to market more towards traditional understandings of who composes their fanbase.  Sydney based teams are much like many of the Melbourne based AFL clubs in this regard.

I had some data from Facebook that said that there were roughly twice as many UCanberra students and alumni who were fans of the club compared to ANU.  I asked them why their fanbase was stronger at the University of Canberra, if it had to do with different cultures or possibly class related affiliations that each university has.  The club responded that they thought they probably had more fans at UC because the university has a well-known sport program and tends to attract more sport fans than ANU.

I had some bebo related geographic data.  It showed that there were a number of fans from the Brisbane area.  I asked the Raiders if they could explain that.  They told me that this geographic fanbase dates to the club’s founding, when several of the players came from Brisbane.  The club has managed to maintain this fanbase in Queensland over time.

The club primarily reaches out to their fanbase using traditional advertising: Newspapers, television and mail outs.  They have a member list and every week they send out a newsletter to their members.  The newsletter contains injury information, game summaries and information on any special deals that the club has.  They do some outreach on social media, but that is primarily confined to Facebook.

The NRL is a huge influence in how the club handles their website and their social media.  The league requires that clubs post certain types of web and video content every week.  This includes a match report and the post-game press conference.  The NRL has incentivized clubs to try to draw traffic to their websites; at the end of the season, revenues earned by the clubs on their sites are distributed to the clubs.  According to the Raiders, the league brought in Bernie Mullin to help it develop a plan regarding their online activities.  The NRL also guides clubs by encouraging them to push to increase their membership.  Some of this push is based around the idea of local clubs and increasing attendance at local grounds and keeping that local identity.

The Canberra Raiders thus use social media as a way to drive traffic to their site.  Based on our conversation, I did not get the feeling that using social media to develop a fanbase was a goal unto itself.  Rather, I was left with the impression that social media was a tool to drive traffic to their site to help increase their revenue.

The NRL does watch other leagues to see what they are doing in terms of social media.  The Raiders do less of this and spend less time developing their own social media strategy.  This is largely because the Raiders feel the NRL has better resources and more money to handle this.  The Raiders also do not have much time to do this on their own.

One of the major areas where the team has acted regarding social media is in giving in their players training in the use of social media training.  The Australian Federal Police conducted this training.  Details about the training can be found on the club’s website at www.raiders.com.au/default.aspx?s=article-display&id=27038 .  This was something the club felt was important because a number of their players are on Facebook.  Some have 2,000 to 3,000 friends, many of whom they do not know personally.  There have been a number of high profile incidents involving players getting negative media attention as a result of their comments on social media sites like Facebook and Twitter; they want to avoid that.  In general, the club advises players to be careful, not to talk about the team and to keep things personal.  The club does not ban the use of it and the NRL is aware of these problems and is encouraging training.

After getting my questions answered, I asked the Raiders about specific aspects of their social media strategy and asked the club if they had any questions based on the data packet I had provided.  The club does have an official Facebook page and Twitter account.  Ben is most familiar with Facebook, which is one of the reasons they use it more than Twitter.  The club’s original Facebook strategy involved creating a user account, friending people and trying to convert these friends into fans of the official fanpage.  The conversion rate was very low and they did not find it very effective in accomplishing their goals.

They are not entirely certain how Twitter fits into their social media strategy and there is a question of how they chose people to follow.  (Compared to other teams in the NRL, they follow almost no one.)  They were interested in increasing their number of followers but were not certain how to do it.  They also did not think that anyone had replied to them or reTweeted them, though this could be a result of not being familiar enough with the site.

We also discussed Foursquare and Gowalla, how they were used and if it was worth it for the team to explore using them.  They were unsure in this regard, as their time is limited.  If it is the next big thing, it might be worth them investigating.

I asked the club about their web traffic, citing some traffic data from Compete.  They said that a number of teams in the NRL share names with other sport teams.  In the case of the Canberra Raiders, it is the Oakland Raiders.  During the season for the other team, they often see an increase in traffic from US based visitors who mistakenly find their site.

I asked if the club had considered using YouTube.  They had.  One of their ideas involved uploading preview clips to Youtube, with attached notices that the full clip could be viewed on their site. They were not certain of the potential ROI and in the end did not use it.  I then asked them if visitors could embed official Raiders videos on their own blogs.  They were not certain but said that fans could definitely link to their videos.

While social media is a big potential audience for the club, most of their dedicated fans online congregate on a message board not controlled by the club.  They do monitor it and find it occasionally to be a concern because of that lack of control.  The club is aware of the fact that the media also monitor this message board and occasionally use it to generate less than favorable story ideas about the site.

In preparation for talking with the Canberra Raiders, I completed an overview of the size of the online community for the team.  If you are interested in this document, please contact me at laura[@]fanhistory[dot]com or my university e-mail address, [email protected]

One of their ideas involved uploading preview clips to Youtube, with attached notices that the full clip could be viewed on their site.  I then asked them if visitors could embed official Raiders videos on their own blogs.

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Socceroos: A creative research data dump (part 3)

Posted by Laura on Saturday, 12 June, 2010

This is the third post in a series of creative research data dumps that relate to the Socceroos.

LinkedIn

League Team Name URL Owner Members Type Access Created Date checked
World Cup Soccer Socceroos Australian Socceroos – Supporters in Business http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=1155907 Luis Aleixo 6 Networking Group 1-Nov-08 15-May-10
World Cup Soccer Socceroos Australian Socceroos – Supporters in Business http://www.linkedin.com/groups?gid=1155907 Luis Aleixo 6 Networking Group 1-Nov-08 3-Jun-10

LiveJournal and clones

Service League Interest Date checked People Communities
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 102
Dreamwidth World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 3
Blurty World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 0
InsaneJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 3
DeadJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 1
JournalFen World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 0
scribbld World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 0
Inksome World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 0
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 15-May-10 102
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer australian national soccer team 15-May-10 0
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer aussie national football team 15-May-10 0
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 28-May-10 102
Dreamwidth World Cup Soccer Socceroos 28-May-10 3
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 3-Jun-10 102 6
Dreamwidth World Cup Soccer Socceroos 7-Jun-10 3 0

This table looks at activity patterns for LJ comms…

Service League Interest Date checked Community name Created on Last updated Comments received Account type Journal entries Tags Memories Virtual gifts Userpics Maintainers Members Watched by
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 the_socceroos 23-Jun-06 Never updated 0 Basic 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 4
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 tim_cahill 18-Nov-05 1-Jul-07 83 Basic 26 0 0 0 1 1 29 25
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 ozsoccer 1-Jun-06 20-May-08 620 Basic 78 0 0 0 3 1 76 65
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 14-May-10 harrykewell_7 4-Jan-07 3-Nov-08 271 Basic 137 13 0 0 5 1 72 68
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 28-May-10 tim_cahill 18-Nov-05 1-Jul-07 83 Basic 26 0 0 0 1 1 29 25
LiveJournal World Cup Soccer Socceroos 28-May-10 the_socceroos 23-Jun-06 Never updated 0 Basic 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 4
LiveJournal AFL Brisbane Broncos 1-Jun-10 brisbanelions 30-Apr-05 30-Apr-05 1 Basic 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 6

MySpace

Service League Interest People Artists Music Videos Albums Songs Videos Images Date gathered
MySpace World Cup Soccer Socceroos 20 12 1 1 1 66 500 14-May-10

Age break down of some accounts’s friends…

League Team Account Date checked Total friends Age: 18-24 Age: 25-29 Age: 30-35 Age: 36-40 Age: 40+
World Cup Socceroos socceroos 28-May-10 769 303 125 42 11 66
Women’s World Cup Matildas matildasonline 28-May-10 8 5 1 2 0 0

Orkut

Service League Team Interest Users Communities Topics Date gathered Notes
orkut World Cup Socceroos Socceroos 36 14 628 5-Jun-10
orkut World Cup All Whites "All Whites" 14 1 319 5-Jun-10 Not all references are to the football team.
orkut Women’s World Cup Matildas Matildas 14 2 124 5-Jun-10 Not all references are to the football team.

Twitter
Looking for growth information…

Service League Team Account Date collected Total followers
Twitter World Cup Socceroos Socceroos 8-Mar-10 353
Twitter World Cup Socceroos socceroos_news (unofficial) 8-Mar-10 1 099
Twitter World Cup Socceroos Socceroos 28-May-10 1 952
Twitter World Cup Socceroos Socceroos 29-May-10 1965
Twitter World Cup Socceroos Socceroos 30-May-10 1 998
Twitter World Cup Socceroos socceroos_news (unofficial) 30-May-10 1 668
Twitter World Cup Socceroos socceroos_news (unofficial) 1-Jun-10 1907
Twitter World Cup Socceroos Socceroos 1-Jun-10 2077
Twitter World Cup Socceroos GGArmy (unofficial) 2-Jun-10 357
Twitter World Cup Socceroos socceroos_news (unofficial) 2-Jun-10 1 701
Twitter World Cup Socceroos Socceroos 2-Jun-10 2 165
Twitter World Cup Socceroos HalfTimeHeroes (soccer fansite) 9-Jun-10 293
Twitter World Cup Socceroos GGArmy (unofficial) 10-Jun-10 390
Twitter World Cup Socceroos socceroos_news (unofficial) 10-Jun-10 1 775
Twitter World Cup Socceroos Socceroos 10-Jun-10 2 661
Twitter World Cup Socceroos HalfTimeHeroes (soccer fansite) 10-Jun-10 293

YouTube

Service League Interest Videos Date gathered
YouTube World Cup Soccer Socceroos 1 760 14-May-10
YouTube World Cup Soccer "All Blacks" 13 200 14-May-10
YouTube Basketball Australia Australian Boomers 98 14-May-10
YouTube Basketball Australia Australian Opals 538 14-May-10
YouTube World Cup Soccer "All Whites" 429 14-May-10

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Townsville Fire on YouTube

Posted by Laura on Sunday, 28 March, 2010

The Townsville Fire are a WNBL team.  Like the Bendigo Spirit, there is a small community of people who have uploaded videos featuring the team on YouTube.  Both have three people who have uploaded a total of four videos.  There is one person in common between the two groups: bbax222.  The other two people are timtufuga and Ambalina1989timtufuga has uploaded a number of videos featuring WNBL teams.  Ambalina1989 has not.   Three of these videos were posted during 2009/2010 season: 1 in October, 1 in November and 1 in December.  The last video was uploaded in March 2008 and features the team’s dance squad.  The four videos that were uploaded have had very few views.  The most watched video is TOWNSVILLE McCAFE FIRE: Rachael Flanagan (interviewed by Jes ) and it has 60 less views than the most popular Bendigo Bombers video.  So far, people just don’t seem to be keen on watching or uploading WNBL videos to YouTube.

The YouTube community again appears to be one of the biggest outside of Facebook.  (Bebo has two people who list them as an interest.)  The Facebook community size is again not based on people listing the team as an interest (important if you are a team and wanting to direct advertising at them) and is instead based on group and fanpage size.

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